You Are Not Your Resumé

I recently attended a celebration of life service for a dear friend’s father.
 
I never knew him, but felt like he was someone I wish I’d known by the end of the service.
 
As I listened to his family talk of him lovingly, I noticed something really interesting.
 
Even though someone mentioned his thirty-six year career at a huge multi-national corporation, not one word was uttered about his work.
 
Nothing about awards given or promotions received, even though he was a very successful business man by any measure. 
 
There was no talk about his compensation, benefits or bonuses. 
 
There were no accolades given for the lack of sick days used or his amazing work ethic.
 
What was highlighted was a man who loved and prioritized his family—
who would coach his children’s sports teams, take them fishing and camping, help them with their homework, watch movies together and play games with them.
 
His family spoke of his sense of humor, the time he spent with them, the trips they took together, and of the love they shared.
 
My point is this: you are not your resume.
 
Your sales numbers and work achievements are not who you are, and they certainly won’t define you when you are gone.
 
Your relationships and the love you shared will.
 
Yes, we all leave behind a work legacy of accomplishments that are worthy of recognition, and that holds a certain amount of importance.
 
But at the end of your life, you will never wish you had spent more time at the office.
 
You will wish you had spent more time connecting, traveling and engaging with those you love and enjoy.
 
There is no medal that you will be given for sacrificing your happiness or your health.
 
So please, maintain perspective when you are feeling overwhelmed with deadlines, commitments, performance reviews and the like.
 
Those are of short term importance, but not terribly important in the scheme of things, and definitely not what will measure your worth at the end of your life.
 
It’s all about the love, peeps.
 
How did you treat people?
 
How did you spend your time?
 
How did you make people feel?
 
That is your legacy.

You Are Not Your Resumé
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